Printed from : The Leisure Media Co Ltd
Study: regular exercise 'makes young people choose healthier foods'

Regular exercise has been linked to better eating habits among young people.

Research by the University of Texas at Austin shows that exercise training appeared to motivate young adults to pursue healthier diets and to regulate their food intake.

The study, published in the International Journal of Obesity, looked at 2,680 sedentary young adults who were put through a 15-week programme of regular physical activities.

Researchers found that, after just a few weeks, the formerly sedentary participants began to be more likely to choose foods like lean meats, fruits and vegetables.

Participants also began ditching fried foods, sugary drinks and other unhealthy foods from their diets. Remarkably, they began choosing healthier foods despite being instructed not to change their diets in any significant way.

"In total, 4,355 dietary observations with 102 food items were collected using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire before and after exercise training," the study reads.

"Most dietary pattern scores were decreased following exercise training, consistent with increased voluntary regulation of food intake."

The research also found that the more participants exercised, the more likely they were to cut down on unhealthy food, while a higher intensity of exercise was linked to an increased preference for healthy foods.

To read the full report, titled The influence of 15-week exercise training on dietary patterns among young adults, click here for the International Journal of Obesity


Close Window